Unlike the Middle East, the coffee culture is not traditionally typical of India. However, this is changing fast. Over the last twenty years, lot s of establishments opened throughout the country, especially in big cities. Indians consider the places as good to meet friends and do business. Coffee chains like Café Coffee Day and Indian Coffee House have grown strongly.

Coffee culture is also a growing novelty in China. However, unlike India, coffee shops are fewer and expensive, seen as something for business and wealthy people.

The coffee culture may appear foreign also to Japan, but we could consider it now as a distinct element of the nation’s habits. There has been a large number of kissaten (coffee-tea shops) in the larger cities since the 1970s. Also, Tokyo visitors should go to the unusual and unique Café Paulista, by far the oldest café in that metropolis still functioning (although its location changed). The establishment was founded in 1911 by Mizuno Ryo, an entrepreneur who received free coffee from the Brazilian government as payback for stimulating Japanese emigration to the country. The Portuguese word “Paulista” is the demonym for someone or something from the São Paulo state.